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July 1, 2005

Iran Today: Lesson From 26 Years Of Appeasement

Topics: Iran

As I posted yesterday, Iran's Ahmadinejad looks to export 'new Islamic revolution'

(AFP via Yahoo) President elect Mahmood Ahmadinejad hailed his election triumph as a new Islamic revolution that could spread throughout the world, in a shift away from previously moderate post-vote rhetoric.

(...) The tone of the remarks harks back to the first years after 1979 Islamic revolution, when the country's leaders frequently pledged to take the revolution beyond Iran.

(...) "The era of oppression, hegemonic regimes, tyranny and injustice has reached its end," he said, in an apparent reference to Iran's arch-foe the United States. "The wave of the Islamic revolution will soon reach the entire world,"

Meanwhile, what have we learned from the past 26 years of Appeasement?

Appeasement_1

A New York Times editorial by Abbas Milani argues that the blatant tyranny on display in last week's Iranian election indicates a silver lining in Iran. (Via TIA Daily)

[C]ontrary to the common perception, this election is not so much a sign of the Iranian system's strength as of its weakness. Last week's presidential election is only the most recent example of the tactical wisdom and strategic foolishness of Iran's ruling mullahs.

All the reformist candidates, particularly Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, as well as the approximately 70 percent of the electorate who voted for reformists or boycotted the election, sought above all to limit Khamenei's increasing despotism. Rather than accepting this possible outcome, Khamenei and his allies made a grab for absolute power.

In the process they may have unwittingly opened the door for democracy -- because their hardball tactics have created the most serious rift in the ranks of ruling mullahs since the inception of the Islamic Republic. The experience of emerging democracies elsewhere has shown that dissension within ruling circles has often presaged the fall of authoritarianism.

Posted by Forkum at June 30, 2005

Should we continue to appease the insanity of the Iranian government and it's spread of Islamic terror?

As I also wrote yesterday: The wave of that which is Islam today, terrorism, has already reached the entire world.

It's time to cut it off at it's roots by recognizing and appropriately addressing it theologically, politically, and militarily, for what it is - a non-religion clothed in the disguise of a flat-earth theology to rule those that are blind to it's violence and ignorant to it's perceived - but totally false, facade of having anything to do with the love and peace of God. With it's sick purpose to rule and control the world, to force non-believers of it's demented and perverted misogynistic culture into submission to it's violent and stone-age sharia law, the fundamentalist's Islam and it's believers belong in the great garbage heap of history's idol-worshipers, along with it's idol - the power to control the lives of others for personal gain, disquised in contrived theology.

Islam today, as practiced by Islamic fundamentalists, is a dead religion worshiping a God that doesn't now, and never did, exist. The God of the fundamentalist's Islam - is Islam, and Islam as it's practiced by the Iranian mullahs and the fundamentalists - is a sham. As much a sham as the Iranian election and it's new president.

If there is a voice of true Islam, is it ever going to be heard and are it's believers ever going to stand up to the Islam of today's fundamentalist mullahs? Either they do so, and do it soon, or "The wave of the Islamic revolution (that) will soon reach the entire world" refered to by Ahmadinejad, is going to result in it's destruction - and I do mean the world's destruction.

Hat tip - Stephi at Free Thoughts

Posted by Hyscience at July 1, 2005 2:09 PM



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