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June 6, 2005

The Wonder of Garlic: "New natural extract for treating MRSA"

Topics: Medicine

There's news on a natural antimicrobial that can deal with a range of drug resistant bacteria and other infections (and even cancer).

A presentation at the American Society for Microbiology meeting in Atlanta hears today about a safe, natural and effective treatment for MRSA infections that are multi-drug resistant. The new formulations of capsules, liquid and crème are extracted from fresh garlic to yield the ONLY commercially available presentation of Allicin.

Stabilised allicin has now been formulated into an active range of products called Allimed™. Powdercapsules, liquid, soap and cream presentations all show highly significant activity against multi-drug resistant organisms including MRSA.

The mechanism of action of allicin may be due to inhibition of certain "thiol-containing" enzymes in the microorganisms by the rapid reaction of thiosulfinates with thiol groups.

This was assumed to be the main mechanism involved in the antibiotic effect of allicin. Recent studies have suggested that the mechanism of action of Allicin may be its ability to react with a model thiol compound (L-cysteine) to form the S-thiolation product S-allylmercaptocysteine.

Samc
S-Allylmercaptocysteine

The identification of the thiolation product was proven by nuclear magnetic resonance as well as by mass spectroscopy.

The main anti-microbial effect of allicin is due to its interaction with important thiol-containing enzymes. In the amoeba parasite, allicin was found to strongly inhibit the cysteine proteinases, alcohol dehydrogenases as well as the thioredoxin reductases (Ankri et al., unpublished results) which are critical for maintaining the correct redox state within the parasite. Inhibition of these enzymes was observed at rather low concentrations (<10 mg/mL).

Allicin also irreversibly inhibited the well known thiol-protease papain, the NADP+ dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Thermoanaerobium brockii and the NAD+ dependent alcohol dehvdrogenase from horse liver. Figure A shows the effect of allicin on alcohol dehydrogenase activity using 2 different alcohol substrates. This indicates the level of alcohol dehydrogenase activity in the solution. There is a clear relationship between reduction in activity and increasing allicin concentration (mg/I)

Allimed capsules contain 450mg of stabilised allicin powder, which consists of non GM maltodextrin, gum acacia and allicin. Normal daily dose is 3 capsules per day all at once or split makes no difference.

Allimed 30ml liquid spray contains only stabilised allicin liquid at a concentration approaching 1000ppm (parts per million) and this can be sprayed into an open wound. Sometimes it might sting a little but this indicates activity. When a wound begins to heal and a fine red layer of new skin develops it is best to stop using the spray as it can irritate new sking growth. At this stage in the haling process it is better to apply a little more cream over the healing wound - or directly into a dressing.

Allimed cream contains 500ppm allicin and at this concentration so far ALL tested strains of MRSA have been easily irradicated. Directions for use suggest that you apply a small amount of the cream around the edge of the wound (or onto cuts bites etc).

Related readings:
Role of chemopreventive agents in cancer therapy.

Allicin (from garlic) induces caspase-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells.

Thermal degradation of allicin in garlic extracts and its implication on the inhibition of the in-vitro growth of Helicobacter pylori.

Synergic anti-tumour effect of B7.1 gene modified tumour vaccine combined with allicin for murine bladder tumour.

Companion post at NewHopeBlog.

Posted by Hyscience at June 6, 2005 11:42 AM



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