Latest Entry: American Pravda and New York's Sixth Crime Family     Latest Comments: Talk Back Here

« Fish may help prevent heart failure as well as heart attacks | Main | Natalee Holloway Roundup »

June 22, 2005

AAV2 has great potential to be developed as an anti-cancer agent

Topics: Medicine

Adeno-associated virus gets its name because it is often found in cells that are simultaneously infected with adenovirus. However, by itself it seems to be harmless.

Unlike adenovirus, AAV

    * does not stimulate inflammation in the host
    * does not elicit antibodies against itself
    * can enter non-dividing cells
    * integrates successfully into one spot in the genome of its host (on chromosome 19 in humans).

Now, we are hearing that according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers, six days is all it takes for adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2), a common, non-disease-causing virus, to kill cervical, breast, prostate and squamous cell cancer cells in laboratory cultures. The study was presented June 20, 2005, at the 24th annual meeting of the American Society for Virology held June 18-22 at Penn State, University Park campus.

Other researchers reported on June 9 of this year that recent advances in AAV-vector technology suggest that AAV-based vectors can be used for cancer gene therapy and that their comparative analysis had revealed that, although AAV2 is the most promising candidate for such an application, serotypes 1 and 3 are valid alternatives. So the work of the Penn State researchers is not only supported by another study, but it appears that serotypes 1,2, and 3 are valid candidates for application in cancer gene therapy.

- News-Medical.Net...

(...) "Our results suggest that adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2), which infects the majority of the population but has no known ill effects, kills multiple types of cancer cells yet has no effect on healthy cells,"

(...) "We believe that AAV2 recognizes that the cancer cells are abnormal and destroys them. This suggests that AAV2 has great potential to be developed as an anti-cancer agent."

(...) The study was presented June 20, 2005, at the 24th annual meeting of the American Society for Virology held June 18-22 at Penn State, University Park campus.

Suggested reading:
Adeno-associated virus serotypes 1 to 5 mediated tumor cell directed gene transfer and improvement of transduction efficiency.

Cross posted at NewHopeBlog

Posted by Hyscience at June 22, 2005 12:28 PM

What about Ovarian cancer. My wife just had surgery to remove cancerous growths from ovaries. Your article didn't mention ovarian cancer as one of the types the virus could help. Was that an oversight, or does the virus not work for ovarian cancer.

Posted by: Jesse at June 30, 2005 4:55 PM



Articles Related to Medicine: