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May 23, 2005

Men with spouses do better after prostate treatment

Topics: Medicine

There's been a lot about prostate cancer in the news lately. According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer will strike 232,090 men this year alone, and of those, 30,350 are expected to die. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men. However, a recent period analysis reported in JCO provided helpful, up-to-date information about the survival experience among men diagnosed with prostate cancer, and bottom line is that most men diagnosed with the disease today can expect to live as long as, or longer than, men their age without the disease. Now there's a report that men with spouses or in a relationship significantly experienced significantly improved quality of life, following treatment.

Being married or in a relationship significantly improves quality of life for prostate cancer patients following treatment, according to a study by researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center and the Department of Urology. Partnered men reported better psychosocial and spiritual well-being, suffered fewer adverse effects from treatment and had less fear and anxiety about their cancer coming back than did their single counterparts, the study found. The research appears in the July 1, 2005, issue of the peer-reviewed journal CANCER, but is being published May 23 on the journal's web site.

"The message for men with prostate cancer is this; it is good to be partnered and have a support system following treatment," said Dr. Mark Litwin, the study's senior author, a professor of urology and public health and a Jonsson Cancer Center researcher. "Now we need to find a way to encourage the use of support groups and support systems in patients who aren't married or in relationships so they can do better, too."

nterestingly, the men in the study represent a group usually overlooked in medical research. With an average income of about $18,000 a year, the sample comprised primarily minorities enrolled in the IMPACT public assistance program, which Litwin directs. In addition to battling cancer, the men studied face the day-to-day struggle of making ends meet. However, these results might be mirrored in other prostate cancer patient populations, who - with fewer challenges - might experience an even better quality of life than the study participants if they seek out and take advantage of support systems.

Being married or in a relationship significantly improves quality of life for prostate cancer patients following treatment, according to a study by researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Cancer Center and the Department of Urology. Partnered men reported better psychosocial and spiritual well-being, suffered fewer adverse effects from treatment and had less fear and anxiety about their cancer coming back than did their single counterparts, the study found. The research appears in the July 1, 2005, issue of the peer-reviewed journal CANCER, but is being published May 23 on the journal's web site.

The report's message for men with prostate cancer is that it is good to be partnered and have a support system following treatment.

Read more ...

Suggested readings:

Period Analysis of Prostate Cancer Survival

Race, Marriage Influence Prostate Cancer Treatment

Cross posted at NewHopeBlog

Posted by Hyscience at May 23, 2005 11:23 AM



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