Latest Entry: American Pravda and New York's Sixth Crime Family     Latest Comments: Talk Back Here

« Juan Cole and Jonah Goldberg - "By Your Enemies" | Main | Lebanese Hezbollah members detained in Iraq: minister »

February 9, 2005

Neurologist on Terri Schiavo's neck injury: What Michael Schiavo can't explain.

Topics: Terri Schiavo's Life Counts

Terri's Exit Protocol discovered in hospice records - see below. Would you let your dog die this way?

As we continue to look at the background and the medical, psychological, and circumstantial evidence that has aroused the critical interest of lay and expert observers alike regarding the strange events and medical facts that have aroused suspicion that Michael Schiavo isn't now and hasn't been acting in Terri Schiavo's best interest and even may have reasons to hasten Terri's execution by painful starvation and dehydration - let's look briefly at a few interesting comments made by Terri's neurologist in court testimony.

From Dr. William Hammesfahr testimony on Terri's neck injury:

Q.   Compounds what, her condition?

A.   Her condition, yes. There is a neck injury.There may be a spinal cord injury, also.

Q.   How were you able to determine a neck injury?

A.    By physical examination. On physical examination, she has several characteristics that are not typical of a stroke. First, she has very severe neck spasms.That's typical of the body's response, splinting the area to prevent injury to that area.

Q.   Splinting the area?

A.    Yeah. If you injure your arm, you will move it. Your muscles will contract around it to keep that area moving. Her muscles around the neck area are heavily contracted to help prevent movement around that area. Later on in the videotape, we actually show that it's almost impossible for her to bend her neck.  You can pick her entire body up off the bed just by putting pressure on the back of  the neck area, which is not typical in brain injury patients but in neck injury patients. In addition, her sensory examination is nothing like a typical stroke patient or typical anoxic encephalopathy.

Q.   Are you experienced in treatment of patients with spinal cord injury?

A.   Yes, I am.

Continue reading to peruse the actual testimony:

Dr. William Hammesfahr testimony on Terri's neck injury 

PLACE: Pinellas County Courthouse

315 Court Street North

Clearwater, Florida

DATE: October 11, 2002

TIME: All day

REPORTED BY: TONYA H. MAGEE, RPR

Court Reporter and Notary Public

Sixth Judicial Circuit

Page 279

4    Anoxic and hypoxic encephalopathies are

5    characterized by multiple small strokes. So depending

6    upon where that stroke is, is where your deficiency is.

7    In your average stroke, the entire side of the body is

8    affected. But in a hypoxic or anoxic episodes, or

9    cerebral palsy, you will see lots of different areas

10   affected. And there may be another injury, a neck

11   injury with her also, which compounds her examination.

12         Q.   Compounds what, her condition?

13         A.   Her condition, yes. There is a neck injury.

14   There may be a spinal cord injury, also.

15         Q.   How were you able to determine a neck injury?

16         A.   By physical examination. On physical

17   examination, she has several characteristics that are

18   not typical of a stroke. First, she has very severe

19   neck spasms. That's typical of the body's response,

20   splinting the area to prevent injury to that area.

21         Q.   Splinting the area?

22         A.   Yeah. If you injure your arm, you will move

23   it. Your muscles will contract around it to keep that

24   area moving. Her muscles around the neck area are

25   heavily contracted to help prevent movement around that

Page 280

1    area. Later on in the videotape, we actually show that

2    it's almost impossible for her to bend her neck.

3    You can pick her entire body up off the bed

4    just by putting pressure on the back of the neck area,

5    which is not typical in brain injury patients but in

6    neck injury patients. In addition, her sensory

7    examination is nothing like a typical stroke patient or

8    typical anoxic encephalopathy.

9          Q.   Are you experienced in treatment of patients

10   with spinal cord injury?

11         A.   Yes, I am.

Page 282

What is interesting is I'm not able to flex

5    the neck. There I tried to bend the neck forward and

6    she doesn't flex forward. What I'm doing to her feels

7    as almost a massage.

8    We are going to come back to that neck a

9    little bit more because I clearly have not completed all

10   of my examination at that time.

Page 325

Q.   Now, her chin does not go down?

18         A.   Her chin does not go down. My hand is

19   essentially on the back of the scull here, not on the

20   neck area. She is rigid in the upper spine area, and

21   that goes along with a neck injury. And that's

22   important for several reasons. First one is that there

23   is a change in the neurological exam. We had a person

24   essentially here that has had brain injury and probably

25   also a spinal cord injury.

Page 326

1          Q.   Spinal cord or vertebral injury?

2          A.   Vertebral injury, but I also suspect, from

3    other parts of my examination, spinal cord injury along

4    with it.

5    In addition, when you have a neck injury, it

6    causes irritation to the sympathetic nerves that control

7    blood flow into the brain. Much of the blood flow to

8    the brain goes in through that area. So when they're

9    damaged, you narrow the blood flow. There is a

10   restricted blood flow to the brain.

Why didn't the police and the district attorney pursue this. Ask them and Judge Greer!

Click on the banner below to find out who you can contact about Terri's case and the efforts of Judge Greer to help Michael Schiavo execute Terri.

DON'T FAIL TO READ ABOUT TERRI'S EXIT PROTOCOL - HOW TERRI WILL DIE IF MICHAEL SHIAVO HAS HIS WAY.

Posted by Hyscience at February 9, 2005 9:32 AM

re: would you let your dog die this way?
unfortunately, many many people DO allow dogs to die under even worse horrific circumstances...
example: http://www.berkeleydaily.org/text/article.cfm?issue=02-08-05&storyID=20680
Whistleblower Accuses California Oakland Animal Shelter of Systemic Abuse

Collectively, most of us mistreat our pets, and reward their lifelong devotion by dumping them at an animal shelter where they may or may not be in horrific pain from their execution...

We have to change our society...

Posted by: M. Ford at February 9, 2005 9:55 PM

Interestimgly enough the verterbal bodie’s that house the vertebral arteries are very close to the carotid arterie’s as well as the basilar which all run adjacent to one another throughout the cervical region , there have been cases of “whiplash” alone that have caused stroke’s due to damage of these arterie’s. Typically in a YOUNGER patient ,physicians aren’t as apt to look for a stroke . It has been said that Terri did have a brain injury ,I can’t help but wonder if the damage found in the brain by an MRI or Cat scan or MRA showed to be consistant with a stroke? It would certainly account for her symptoms and current condition as well as the physicans reports ,s een here online that there was deffinately a spinal cord type injury to the cervical region.

I wonder if the tests showed Terri did have a major storke? While the documents state she doesn't have the typical stroke symptom's ,could very well be construed as SHE HAS all the typical symptoms of a major stroke,however she also has symptoms that do not coorelate with JUST A STROKE alone ,but cervical and spinal cord injury as well.

So to have neck and spinal cord injury and THEN have had the major stroke would account for all her symptoms ...How to find out what an MRI/MRA/Cat scan showed of the brain at that time?

Posted by: Interested at February 24, 2005 10:12 AM

I'm not sure about the best way to provide this information, so please disseminate it to the appropriate parties. I am a chiropractic neurologist in Texas. There have been remarkable results seen in brain-damaged patients using the functional neurology modalities. This is not traditional chiropractic that many are familiar with.
I am suggesting that you contact someone who is most likely the world's best in treating brain-damaged patients. His name is Dr. Ted CCarrick. Go to www.carrickinstitute.com for info. He is well-known for helping coma and stroke patients get their lives back. (you may have seen him on a PBS special a few years back, called "Waking Up the Brain"). He is in Florida, and may be able to offer a solution that others have not considered. Too much energy has been directed toward the legal battle and surrounding drama--rather than continuing to find a way to get Terri back. Keep an open mind about this. It's not necessarily over.

Dr. Heith Root

Posted by: Dr. Heith Root at March 27, 2005 1:19 PM



Articles Related to Terri Schiavo's Life Counts: