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December 2, 2004

Possible synergistic prostate cancer suppression by anatomically discrete pomegranate fractions.

Topics: Clinical Pharmacology

Abstract Review of Article in process:
Invest New Drugs. 2005 Jan;23(1):11-20. Lansky EP, Jiang W, Mo H, Bravo L, Froom P, Yu W, Harris NM, Neeman I, Campbell MJ., Rimonest Ltd., Horev Center, Box 9945, Haifa, Israel. info@rimonest.com.

We investigated whether dissimilar biochemical fractions originating in anatomically discrete sections of the pomegranate ( Punica granatum ) fruit might act synergistically against proliferation, metastatic potential, and phosholipase A2 (PLA2) expression of human prostate cancer cells in vitro .

Proliferation of DU 145 human prostate cancer cells was measured following treatment with a range of therapeutically active doses of fermented pomegranate juice polyphenols (W) and sub-therapeutic doses of either pomegranate pericarp (peel) polyphenols (P) or pomegranate seed oil (Oil).

Invasion across Matrigel by PC-3 human prostate cancer cells was measured following treatment with combinations of W, P and Oil such that the total gross weight of pomegranate extract was held constant.

Expression of PLA2, associated with invasive potential, was measured in the PC-3 cells after treatment with the same dosage combinations as per invasion. Supra-additive, complementary and synergistic effects were proven in all models by the Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric H test at p < 0.001 for the proliferation tests, p < 0.01 for invasion, and p < 0.05 for PLA2 expression.

Proliferation effects were additionally evaluated with CompuSyn software median effect analysis and showed a concentration index CI < 1, confirming synergy.

The results suggest vertical as well as the usual horizontal strategies for discovering pharmacological actives in plants.
PMID: 15528976

Posted by Hyscience at December 2, 2004 10:39 PM



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